By Jill McCubbin

market2world’s President Nathan Rudyk recently blogged in this space about how corporate culture will be impacted by university students raised on Web 2.0 technology. But what about the generation after them, referred to as the Millenials?

Millenials are the young people in today’s classrooms - tomorrow’s customers, employees, executives, competition.

Consider these student and parent quotes from Writings & Presentations by Marc Prensky, an educational and learning speaker and author:

 

"When I go to school, I have to power down" (high school student)

 

"I don't want to study Rome in high school. Hell, I build Rome every day in my online game (Caesar III)." (high school student)

"The cookies on my daughter's computer know more about her interests than her teachers do." (Henry Kell, President, AFS)

 

The Millenials not only have tech savvy, but the innate sense to find the information gold faster, when their environment permits them to. Time Magazine recognizes these kids as global citizens and reinforces their craving for comprehensive information and education.

A group of students challenged a group of teachers to a “Geography Duel” at the Advanced Broadband Enabled Learning (ABEL) conference in Toronto ON:

 

“The teachers were given atlases (‘you guys are used to books’) and the students Google Earth. All had to answer some tough questions. While the results were, in fact, close in some cases, the students triumphed by finding the exact distance between two cities in an instant (Google Earth has a tool for this) while the best answer the teachers came up with using atlas and ruler was '7 centimeters.'”

 

Clearly, the Millenials can outsmart the competition when they’re (em)powered up. The Millenials are challenging the marketplace and our education systems. And all they need are the Web 2.0 tools they’ve been raised with and the encouragement to use them.

(Jill McCubbin is a Communications Strategist with market2world communications inc., Canada's Web 2.0 tech product launch and public relations agency.)

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